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What should Brandon Morrow’s role be in Cubs 2019 bullpen?

Since the Cubs’ early exit from the postseason, many have turned their attention to the 2019 roster and wonder if Brandon Morrow will be the team’s closer next year.

However, the question isn’t WILL Morrow be the closer, but rather — SHOULD he be counted on as the main ninth-inning option?

Morrow didn’t throw a single pitch for the Cubs after the All-Star Game, nursing a bone bruise in his forearm that did not heal in time to allow him to make a return down the stretch.

Of course, an injury isn’t surprising given Morrow’s lengthy history of arm issues. 

Consider: Even with a half-season spent on the DL, Morrow’s 35 appearances in 2018 was his second-highest total since 2008 (though he also spent a ton of time as a starting pitcher from 2009-15).

Morrow is 34 now and has managed to throw just 211 innings in 126 games since the start of the 2013 season. 

Because of that, Theo Epstein isn’t ready to anoint Morrow the Cubs’ 2019 closer despite success in the role in his first year in Chicago (22-for-24 in save chances).

“[We’re] very comfortable with Morrow as part of a deep and talented ‘pen,” Epstein said. “We have to recommit to him in a very structured role and stick with it to do our best to keep him healthy. Set some rules and adhere to them and build a ‘pen around that. I’m comfortable.”

Epstein is referencing the overuse the Cubs have pointed to for the origin of Morrow’s bone bruise when he worked three straight games from May 31-June 2 during a stretch of four appearances in five days.

Joe Maddon and the Cubs were very cautious with Morrow early in the year, unleashing him for only three outings — and 2 innings — in the first two-plus weeks of the season, rarely using him even on back-to-back days.

During that late-May/early-June stretch, Morrow also three just 2 pitches in one outing (May 31) and was only called upon for the 14th inning June 2 when Maddon had already emptied the rest of the Cubs bullpen in a 7-1 extra-inning victory in New York.

The blame or origin of Morrow’s bone bruise hardly matters now. All the Cubs can do at this moment is try to learn from it and carry those lessons into 2019. It sounds like they have, heading into Year 2 of a two-year, $21 million deal that also includes a team option for 2020.

“It’s the type of injury you can fully recover from with rest,” Epstein said. “that said, he has an injury history and we knew that going in. That was part of the calculation when we signed him and that’s why it was the length it was and the amount of money it was, given his talent and everything else.

“We were riding pretty high with him for a few months and then we didn’t have him for the second half of the season. And again, that’s on me. We took an educated gamble on him there and on the ‘pen overall, thinking that even if he did get hurt, we had enough talent to cover for it. And look, it was a really good year in the ‘pen and he contributed to that greatly in the first half.

“They key is to keep him healthy as much as possible and especially target it for down the stretch and into what we hope will be a full month of October next year.”

It’s clear the Cubs will be even more cautious with Morrow in 2019, though he also should head into the new campaign with significantly more rest than he received last fall when he appeared in all seven games of the World Series out of the Dodgers bullpen.

Morrow has more than proven his value in this Cubs bullpen as a low-maintenance option when he’s on the field who goes right after hitters and permits very few walks or home runs. 

But if the Cubs are going to keep him healthy for the most important time of the season in September and October, they’ll need to once again pack the bullpen with at least 7 other arms besides Morrow, affording Maddon plenty of options.

When he is healthy, Morrow will probably get a ton of the closing opportunities, but the world has also seen what Pedro Strop can do in that role and the Cubs will likely add another arm or two this winter for high-leverage situations.

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